5.2 Create Your First EC2 Instance Part 1

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Time
3 hours 27 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
4
Video Transcription
00:02
in this video,
00:04
we will create our first easy to instance
00:10
we will create our first security group.
00:13
We will create a P K. I keep pair for you, see two instance
00:18
and create a Web server on our instance.
00:23
In our last video, we introduced the fundamentals of the sea, too.
00:28
In this video, we will lap it up
00:31
and create our first easy to instance, step by step.
00:35
So from the management console, let's type easy to then enter.
00:42
This takes us to the EEC to dashboard
00:46
under. The resource is
00:48
you can see that we have zero in running instances
00:54
or any other related instance types.
00:58
We do have one security group that is part of our default. VPC
01:03
more on VP sees in upcoming lessons
01:07
and of course, we are in the U. S. East North Virginia region.
01:15
So let's click. Launch instance
01:21
Here is where we can select our Amazon machine images
01:27
and Amazon machine image is basically a pre built virtual machine.
01:33
If we scroll down,
01:34
we could see the variety of platform types that are available to us.
01:38
Let's click free tier
01:41
to filter just those images that come is part of our free tier subscription.
01:48
For the purposes of our course,
01:49
we will be working primarily with the Amazon Lennox machine image.
01:55
There are two types of images.
01:57
HTM, which stands for a hardware virtual machine,
02:01
and P V, which stands for power. Virtual
02:06
the differences between the two are related to how they boot
02:09
and what special hardware extensions that they can take advantage of.
02:15
We will leave it as the default value,
02:20
so click select.
02:23
This takes us to the choose instance type screen.
02:27
This is where we can see a full list
02:29
and description of the various
02:31
AM I sizes and performance levels that are available.
02:37
Let's leave it as the default T to micro instance and click configurations.
02:43
This is where we configure our instance details.
02:46
By default. We run one instance,
02:50
but we have the ability to launch his many as we need.
02:54
Purchasing option is where we could select the type of instance, such as on demand reserved or spot
03:01
that we discussed. In our last lesson.
03:05
I will select
03:07
request spot instances to demonstrate the concept further.
03:13
Here are the current prices, for instance, type
03:15
rated per hour.
03:17
If anyone has ever traded stocks
03:20
this is similar to creating a limit order
03:23
where we provide the target price that we would buy it
03:28
with spot instances. We provide the maximum amount that we're willing to pay for a spot instance per hour.
03:35
I will bid five cents.
03:42
Many of these are self explanatory,
03:44
but a useful description pops up
03:46
when we hover over them.
03:49
Network is important,
03:52
and we will dive in much deeper. During our VPC lessons.
03:59
We will allow Amazon to assign our instance an I P. Address
04:03
placement groups
04:05
are out of scope for our course.
04:09
Scroll down further.
04:12
Actually, I will. Just my screen so that we could see the options at the bottom
04:16
under advanced details
04:18
is where we can script the creation of our instances.
04:23
We will actually do this in the future lesson, so stay tuned.
04:27
Next. Let's click. Add storage.
04:30
This brings us to the root volume.
04:33
The route volume is like the C drive on your computer,
04:39
and it is where the system will boot from
04:43
by default. The volume is eight Gibby Bites.
04:48
Volume type refers to the type of underlying disc that the instance will use,
04:57
and by default,
04:59
the boot volume gets deleted when we terminate the instance.
05:02
And, of course,
05:04
since this is a boot, Dr Essentially
05:08
it's system files are not encrypted.
05:11
Let's click. Add volume.
05:13
Here we can add additional storage.
05:16
This storage is designed to persist,
05:18
so I noticed that the dolly on termination check boxes not selected,
05:25
and we have the option of encrypting the files on the drive.
05:30
Since this is just a demonstration,
05:31
I will cancel adding the additional volume.
05:34
Next, let's click. Add tags.
05:39
Here we can add tags that can help us to identify the purpose of the instance.
05:45
So I will just add a couple of tags.
05:56
Next we click Configure Security Group.
05:59
The security group is basically the firewall. For instance,
06:04
let's create a new one. For instance,
06:09
I will call this cyber ery demo D M Z,
06:16
and then copy and paste the name into the description
06:26
by default.
06:28
S s Ages allowed
06:30
sssh allows us to securely interact with our instance from its command line.
06:36
We will need to add more ports since our instance will be a Web server.
06:42
So let's add H T T p for Internet traffic
06:46
and H T T P s
06:49
for SSL traffic
06:54
under source.
06:55
We can restrict who can access our instance from the Internet.
07:00
If I select my I P,
07:03
then it automatically will populate my I P address.
07:09
I will leave it as anywhere for now.
07:12
And then you see below that Amazon is warning me to restrict which I p addresses can reach our instance.
07:20
This is actually a security best practice.
07:25
Next, let's click review and launch.
07:30
This takes us to the review
07:31
of our spot instance Request.
07:34
We selected the Amazon Lennox. Am I
07:39
a tea to micro instance,
07:42
with just the instant storage.
07:45
Next we review our security group
07:48
noticed that our security group creates rules for I p Version four
07:54
and I pee Version six.
07:59
The instance. Details just contains a bit more detailed information about our instance.
08:07
Next we expand storage
08:11
where we see our route volume
08:16
and then we expand tags.
08:20
What we can see. The tags that we created,
08:26
everything looks as we expect.
08:28
So let's attempt to launch our instance
08:39
when we click Launch were prompted to either select an existing keep hair or create a new pair.
08:48
So, as a quick analogy,
08:50
I think of the key pair
08:52
as a lock box and the key
08:54
The lockbox
08:56
represents the public key
08:58
while the private key can be compared to the key that opens the lock box.
09:05
So let's select creating new key pair.
09:09
Then we give it a name.
09:13
I will name this one. Cyber Eri
09:16
underscored d m z.
09:18
Then we click download key pair
09:22
A W s then generates a private key for us in a text file.
09:28
This will be the key that we must use to access our E c two instance
09:35
A W s ensures that we acknowledge this fact
09:37
that we have the private key in our possession.
09:43
Then we click, create spot instance
09:46
and we see that our instance creation has failed.
09:50
Perhaps the spot instances unavailable at the rate that I set my bid for.
09:56
So let's go back to our am I
10:00
and remove the spot instance request
10:11
and just used the on demand option
10:16
Click launch
10:18
Acknowledge the private key warning again
10:22
and launch our instance
10:24
This time our launch is successful.
10:28
We can click view instances to see the real time status of our instance
10:35
are instances pending
10:37
down here we can view the public i p address that a W S has assigned, for instance,
10:45
copy this to the clipboard because we will need it to access our instance.
11:09
Great job, everyone.
11:11
Now that we have our instance up and running, feel free to take a break
11:16
in the next part of our lab. We will log into our instance from the command line interface. See you in the next video.
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