Time
8 hours 33 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
9

Video Transcription

00:05
So let's discuss in depth the Google and Android platform.
00:11
It's an open source platform maintained by Google. It's built on a Lennox colonel.
00:16
If you were to see the colonel, it wouldn't look like most other Lennox kernels. So they've customized this limits, Colonel. Actually, the company they purchased that actually invented Android
00:27
customized the Colonel. But it's now Google's.
00:30
There's control. They control access to all the vice resource is it is not hardware specific. It can be run on smartphones. Tablets world. I'm meeting a set top boxes. Personal computers. You don't see it very often on computers, but there are Google TV's out there.
00:47
I can buy a Google TV. It's running the Android operating system. Now. They've done some customization to it, but not as much as you would think they would need to do to get it running on TV.
00:59
Android applications The native APS are dependent on the native libraries. This chart actually shows
01:07
the features of each section, so we concede the display driver's part of the Lenox Colonel saying with WiFi driver and all the other drivers, this section is read only by default, so you're not able to write or you're not supposed to be able to write to this section.
01:23
Then we have the library's built on top. The colonel's, the library's air. What are supposed to be used for the apse toe actually run on the platform.
01:33
Most third party APS are actually written in Java.
01:37
This is why there's one of reasons Oracle has been in the process of suing Google for the last
01:45
forever. The last couple of years,
01:48
Oracle says, you've
01:53
you're using our patents illegally. You haven't paid us to use our patents. We have this technology patented.
01:57
You can't use this without paying us royalties. And Google said no. We came up with our own customer custom
02:04
Java Colonel or you have Java platform and we're not,
02:07
um, using your patents.
02:12
It's finally going to court. So event Finally, the court is going to decide whether Google is
02:17
after these patent or using these patents inappropriately or not. And if they are, then they're gonna oh, Oracle money.
02:23
Well, see, that's up in the air
02:27
all APS running android sandbox, and we'll discuss what this sandbox does in a second.
02:31
That's right.
02:32
AP Dad is written to dedicated sections of the file system So it's on Lee certain areas where these applications were actually able to be written again. We want to keep the colonel and the libraries
02:45
as a part from the virtual
02:49
area, slashed the applications as we can.
02:52
We want there to be too big of a gap for the application to jump over. If we think in physical terms,
02:59
anybody can develop an app using the android sdk.
03:02
You can go online to Google type in android sdk
03:08
and you'll be taken right to the developer site where you can download both the virtual environment and which ever version of the operating system. You want to have everything up through I C s in there. So if you want to develop for I C s u you knew for free, you just have to pay an upload fee
03:29
to Google if you actually want the app to run in the marketplace.
03:34
So you develop all you want. It's only when you try to sell it or give it away in the marketplace that you actually have to pay the feet of Google.
03:40
You can install software from multiple sources. So the android market itself has over 450,000 naps, and this was as of
03:50
December January. Timeframe of 2011
03:53
or 2000 December 2011 Thio January 2012.
03:59
If they're not at 500,000 APS at this point, they're really close to 500,000.
04:03
The AP, um,
04:05
the APP ecosystem has been increasing pretty rapidly, so they've been putting a lot of resource is
04:13
into catching up with the
04:15
apple marketplaces. Apple had a couple of years
04:17
basically head start on Google.
04:20
However, the disadvantage of this is it. The software is open source, which means that anybody could get access to the source code
04:30
now
04:30
open. Source proponents will argue well, with more people having access to the source code. That means there's more eyes on the source code, so there's more chance off bugs being found. And this this argument goes back.
04:46
Proximity First computer was created, but at least when Windows and Linux were in the nineties, having there
04:55
or the fan boys were having their war.
04:57
What's better? Windows or Linux and the open source people, said Lynn Nix, is better because I can see the source code and I can see exactly what the operating system is doing.
05:05
Windows proponents said Windows is better because the operate systems proprietary so bad people can't find out what this horse cortez.
05:16
But the proprietary source code was still leaked in the bad. People were still able to get the source code, and they're still able to look at it.
05:24
However, many people are looking at it. There's gonna be bucks. It's software. There's so many lot, millions of lines of code.
05:30
There's going to be bugs. There's never been a perfect piece of code written,
05:34
and they probably never will be a perfect piece of code written. That's why there's constant firmware upgrades,
05:41
as as well as adding features these address bugs that were found on the operating system, whether by Google or by other people that notified Bugle that these bugs were here
05:55
in order to use Theo Android trademark. So even though the software is open source, you can't use Android unless you agree to Google's definition Document the compatibility definition document that Google has that says you must have these features to be able to call your phone and android device,
06:15
and it's about 100 pages long and it's on their website. The Android SDK
06:19
website. But it's stuff like
06:21
you have to have an email client.
06:25
You have torus have to have either use Google's email client or you have to have an equivalent email client. You have to have calendar. You've got to be able to do this. You've got to be able to do this.
06:34
So using that. And most people want to use the Android trademark because they want to be able to say this is an android phone.
06:43
I don't know many phones out there that are using
06:46
the Google operating system
06:47
without complying with the Android definition document,
06:53
because the trademark is what people know. When somebody goes to the store, they don't go.
06:59
I'm gonna buy the the latest
07:01
operating system running
07:03
the this operating system. They go. I want to buy a Google phone or I want to buy an android phone.
07:09
And if it doesn't if it doesn't conform with the
07:13
definition document compatibility document,
07:15
they can't say that it's a Google android. Come
07:20
so along with having the ability or releasing the ability or working on the ability to tax secure communication, Essay actually collaborated with Google to create a secure colonel
07:32
that allows the android to be cleared for classified communication.
07:38
So the Dell streak
07:40
was not in conjunction with NSA, but Del worked with Google to make sure that their device was disapproved. Well, at the same time, Del was working with Disa to get d o D. Approval was working on their own, Colonel.
07:56
The energy they developed a hard and colonel so that Andrea can pass all the necessary security measures being option for government years. It's not supporting all the vices. What it actually does is it replaces the default, colonel.
08:11
So basically, you're rooting your device and installing a custom colonel on the device so that it meets N s a security requirements.
08:20
Sir,
08:22
are there any hard work factors required for compliance with these security?
08:26
Well,
08:28
for the same version or just working with Google for were they working with them from Harbor Adjustment?
08:37
They were working primarily on the dis aside, so they looked at the desist IG and said, Okay, what requirements are part of the distinct and by default,
08:48
Google already meets
08:50
these five requirements.
08:54
So using the hardware and software that point, how can we make it so that it meets the rest. There were requirements. Mostly, it's gonna be software based. Why wouldn't I haven't seen the internals of the streak? I wouldn't be surprised if there is some custom hardware in there allowing, uM,
09:11
like the like encryption.
09:13
The version of this factory. The streak is running three point now, so the three point it was part of it, so mostly it could be a software adjustment that they've done we'll be taking. This knowledge is rolling into Carl's in the future.
09:31
That's probably that's up to their agreement with both the NSA and Dell.
09:35
I would hope, as a consumer that they're angry. They're agreement allows them to
09:41
incorporate some of the security features.
09:45
I wouldn't be surprised if the NSA one does. I'd be a little more surprised if the Dell one does, because
09:50
Dells in business to make money.
09:54
So if they can come out with a device that's approved for government use when or D o. D A use when no other device is able to Andhra devices able to be used for d o d use
10:07
Del is gonna want to keep that is close to the vest is they can, because then they're the sole provider, Thio
10:13
the D o d. They're the only android device that can be used for this function.
10:20
I haven't done the research, so I don't know if the improvements that both DEL the Dell Streak saw to get d o. D approval or the N s a colonel upgrade. The changes they made are gonna be rolled into
10:33
the Google operating system. I would hope so.
10:35
Um,
10:37
I hate software patents. I know they're a necessary evil. I understand that
10:43
Google Microsoft
10:46
Apple Rim put a lot of money into the software they develop.
10:50
But the way they're used
10:52
and usually ends up stifling the creative process,
10:56
Apple comes up with a improvement, and then
11:01
all the consumers want that. So
11:03
Google, Microsoft
11:05
RAM have to either pay
11:09
Apple
11:09
for the right to use it
11:11
or they had to come up with another way to the exact same thing
11:18
or they have to break the patent.
11:20
And the problem is the development cycle for these. Google might have been working on a feature for the last year.
11:28
Apple releases their phone and they right before they release it, they patent the new software in it. Well, if Google was already working on something in a parallel track and didn't know that Apple was about to release it. What are they supposed to do? Are they supposed to just say, do you want I'm not going to release this update anymore.
11:48
I'm going thio, uh, get rid of it.
11:52
Probably. No. They're gonna roll the dice and say we're gonna release it anywhere, and we'll let the patent office decide whether it
12:01
their patent is valid and that that validation process can take years. So Apple releases the phone, they have 10 new things and they patent those 10 new things. The patent office may come back and say, on Lee, these four are relevant, but it may take them a year or two to come back and say that.
12:18
So is Google just supposed to stop all the work they're doing while they wait to find out whether
12:22
the patent office approves apples, patents or not,
12:28
the way Microsoft is getting around around this? Is there actually going toe all the android manufacturers and coming into separate licensing agreements with the android
12:41
manufacturers? They're saying
12:43
Androids using patents that we own,
12:46
we will gladly license them to you but you have to pay us a percentage of each device you sell for X, Y and Z pens.
12:56
Most of the Android manufacturers have agreed to do this. So for every Androids phone that sold, Microsoft is actually getting a cut of the pie for the patents that they either created or that they currently own.

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