Patch Panel and 110 Block

Video Activity

Patch Panel and 110 Block This lesson discusses Patch panels and 110 blocks. A patch panel allows for termination and switching a connection. A 110 block allows for terminating connections by punching them down in the 110 block. Participants view a physical simulation with step by step directions of how to set up a Patch Panel.

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Time
31 hours 29 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
30
Video Description

Patch Panel and 110 Block This lesson discusses Patch panels and 110 blocks. A patch panel allows for termination and switching a connection. A 110 block allows for terminating connections by punching them down in the 110 block. Participants view a physical simulation with step by step directions of how to set up a Patch Panel.

Video Transcription
00:04
So what are some of the different ways that we can connect all of this infrastructure throughout our environment? Well, when it comes to our Ethernet, you tp cabling at least one of the ways that we can connect them are with patch panels and 1 10 blocks. So what are these patch panels in these 1 10 blocks? Well, a patch panel
00:21
is essentially a connection block, which allows for termination and connection and switching
00:26
of difference of different cables on in layer one level patch panels and 1 10 blocks don't do any layer to switching. They don't do any layer three switching. They don't route anything. They don't switch. They just simply make a physical layer. One connection.
00:43
Now an example of a one a patch panel we have here now a patch panel.
00:49
It is simply
00:51
some punch down, punch down segments on one side that correspond with a physical port on the other side. And what we We plug one cable into the front that we want to go to the cable that we have in the back that goes sometimes typically, Thio say, a drop in our wall.
01:08
Now, when we're talking about a 1 10 block. On the other hand,
01:12
Ah, 1 10 block is like a network version of a phone 66 block. Now, 1 10 block would look like just the back of our patch panel
01:23
1 10 block. We're gonna be able to terminate connections by punching them down into our 1 10 block. And if we need to make additional connective ITI, we can have additional blocks that we connect on to the top that we punch down our first set, set our connection block and then punched down our next set
01:41
of connections that we want to connect into that block.
01:44
So we have just what would our 1 10 block look like versus our patch panel, which is looks like almost like a 1 10 block on the back. And then a patch panel in the front will re plug in our ports.
01:57
So how do we use these in practice? It's nice to know what they are. It's nice to know what they can do. We plug in a physical port on one side. We plug in our cabling on the other side or the patch panel. We just terminate the connection's down, and then connect our wires over to other connections. But how would we run one in practice?
02:15
Well, let's first draw a diagram, and then we're gonna go ahead and we're gonna take a look at our
02:20
physical. We're gonna take a look at a physical simulation. So
02:24
if we had a network,
02:28
let's say it's it's kind of this widely dispersed.
02:32
And in our network we have our Internet connection from our Internet service provider,
02:38
and that Internet connection
02:39
comes down. Thio, our router
02:45
and then our router
02:47
is at our eyes near our Demark point, where our Internet service provider brings into our building and then our router connects to over to our network closet. Now in our network closet, we have a couple of switches and the switches correspond with different areas of our office. These correspond
03:07
with different villian segments in our office,
03:09
and we need to have a way that we can we can connect our our router to our difference are different switches to our different drops in our wall.
03:21
So we have one switch
03:23
that we used to plug our router into,
03:28
and that allows our router to plug into
03:32
a couple of other switches that service the different networks segments in our office.
03:38
So we have three additional switches in our network closet
03:44
that service different areas of our office and we connect them
03:49
to our switch that goes over to our router so they can communicate with the router.
03:58
Or we may just draw three lines or we may just pull three lines from my router over to these switches. It just depends on what we want to do in our network.
04:08
Now, these three switches also have cables that go over to go over to network drops. Now,
04:15
we can either take our cables that go over to our different network drops, and we could terminate them with a standard clip end and then plug them into our switch
04:25
or we could set up a patch panel.
04:29
So next we have our patch panel here
04:33
and our patch panel goes to
04:35
on the back of our patch panel where we have our punch down our punch down side goes to all of our different network drops.
04:45
So it goes over to all of our different network drops,
04:49
and then the front side of our patch panel, we're gonna plug the cable into that front side of the patch panel and then plug it into one of our switches. Now this allows us rather than having to terminate cables in, say, a 1 10 block or having to plug them directly into the switch. We can easily make modifications to this patch panel
05:09
we could
05:10
plug in. We could plug in a particular drop to a single switch, or we could. We could take that drop into a different switch or maybe plugging into a different port on the same switch. If that port becomes bad, we can once we get everything marked, which is why we have our nice little clear segments here.
05:27
Once we get everything marked as to what it corresponds with what that port
05:30
where that drop goes to then we can move is necessary. We don't have to guess it's a lot easier to manage it.
05:38
So we have our back side of our drop down, which will go to all of our different drops in our walls
05:44
and then the front side of our patch panel,
05:46
which will plug into our different switches
05:57
on. And then we can again we can move. Those is necessary.
06:02
So let's take a look at
06:04
Let's take a look at this in our little physical simulation here.
06:10
So
06:10
this is going to be our network and our network. We're gonna imagine that each of our breaks between our three devices here is it's a lot is a lot more widespread. Um, we're gonna have our router is going to be in one side of our office, and then we have cabling that goes through our ceilings to our network closet. Here is gonna be our network closet,
06:29
which goes over, and then we have a segment, and then
06:31
it goes over to our actual physical computer. It goes over to an actual work office.
06:36
So
06:40
first we have First we have our router Now are router. We're going to
06:46
me to get a signal from our router to our switch area to our network closet.
06:50
So we're gonna go ahead and we're just gonna simply take our cable
06:55
plugging into the back of our router,
06:58
and then we're gonna go over to our switch
07:01
and our network closet.
07:03
Now, this router has multiple different ports in the back. So we're going to say that we we segment out each of these different ports to different sub nets and then connect each of these different ports to different to different switches. So this is Ah, this is our one of our This is one of our switches that we put that into,
07:23
so we have our cable that comes through our ceiling
07:25
and plugs into our into our switch.
07:29
Now, our next step is to get data from our switch to our patch panel.
07:35
We don't take our drops that go into our walls and plug them directly into our switch. These go into the back of our patch panels,
07:43
so
07:45
we need to get data from our switch
07:48
over into our patch panel.
07:53
Now, remember, patch panels are going to function at layer one.
07:57
All they're going to provide is just physical connective ity.
08:01
So now we have data from our router over to our switch and then from our switches, going to send those packets to our cable that is going to go to our workstation,
08:13
and then that goes directly into our patch panel.
08:16
So what do we do now? How are we going to get the data from our patch panel over to our Waldrop? Well,
08:24
here we have our Waldrop.
08:26
We made this in an earlier video segment,
08:30
and this wall drop is typically going to go into A is going to go into a face plate in our wall, and we'll plug our computer into that fate into that wall drop. So this may look a little bit odd, but that's because you may be used to seeing this with a face plate around it and then four of these in a group.
08:46
So this is going to be our in point
08:50
on the other side of this cable. On the other side of this wall drop,
08:56
we have our opened up
08:58
U T P Cable.
09:01
This is our cat six cable
09:03
in this cat six cable. We went ahead and sliced it open, but now we're going to go. We're going to unwind each of these,
09:13
um,
09:13
each of these different segments here because, remember, we are you tp cabling.
09:18
Our cat six
09:22
unshielded twisted pair
09:24
is going to be made up of eight.
09:26
Cable's twisted into four bundles of two.
09:31
So now we have our eight cable separated
09:35
and we have our orange, orange, white, blue, blue, white,
09:39
green, green, white, brown, brown, white
09:41
So what do we do next? We have most separated.
09:45
Well, now we have a punch down block
09:48
and our punch down block is going to have everything already. Court color coordinated for us.
09:54
So everything's gonna be all color coordinated.
09:58
Now we have the blue, orange, green and brown, and we need to make sure that we're connecting knees in the same order were connecting our blue whites, green whites or in whites and brown whites in the same way we would if we were lining this up on a tape on an actual cable connector on like an r j
10:16
45 cable connector.
10:18
If we're using an A standard and if we're using an a standard and we need to connect a switch to a device, we would plug this in as if it was a straight we would connect this up as if it was a straight through cable. We would we connect this up in the A standard. We wouldn't want to cross it over way we wouldn't want to do a cross over here. We wouldn't want to
10:39
do a, uh, be standard
10:41
the state of different standards. We talked about how we color coordinate those in an earlier module. But we want to make sure we use our same cabling. Standard are same are same color order as we did when we set up our cable ends, as we did when we set up our drop and what our cable that we're using to connect to our switches on what our switches
10:58
and then our switch overto our router is
11:03
So we have our cable all I'll set up here.
11:05
So now all we're going to d'oh
11:09
is we're just gonna line up our cable ings
11:15
and their corresponding punch downs,
11:18
and we're gonna take our punch down. Tools are punch down, tool we're going to use with our
11:24
patch panel.
11:26
And this is this is the same procedure that we would be doing If this was, say, a 1 10 block except the 1 10 block, we wouldn't have the ports on the front. So there would be a different way that we would actually have to block in and punch the and actually punch down what we were connecting to.
11:41
So we face are cutting side toward what are remainder. What we want to cut off.
11:48
We start punching down
12:18
now It's always good to make sure that you're using
12:22
sharp blades on your punch down
12:24
because, as you can see,
12:26
this dull blade isn't getting the job done with actually cutting our excess off.
12:31
So that would mean
12:33
that following everything up,
12:35
we would actually need to
12:39
physically cut these down,
12:41
cut these off our cells.
12:43
But if we were using an actual
12:48
well sharpened, punch down tool blade, then this wouldn't be
12:52
an issue.
12:54
So make sure all of your tools are properly kept.
12:58
But this being a being a class punch down tool, it goes through a lot of wear.
13:13
Okay, so now we have all of our cable ings punch down here. We would if we were actually setting this network up. We would want to cut all of this excess off. That's bad. We wouldn't want that hanging off there,
13:24
but
13:26
for our demonstration purposes, we have this whole punch down
13:30
and we could see now that we have our cable secured
13:33
and that Kate and that cabling block corresponds with the same port that we plugged into here.
13:39
So
13:41
so now we're going to do is we're just going to run our cable
13:46
over to where we're going to set up our Waldrop. We're gonna drop this down in our wall
13:52
and plug it into our face plate
13:58
and then our physical computer here,
14:01
we're just gonna plug our cable into the back
14:07
and then plug it into our wall part our actual wall port.
14:13
So we can see now how
14:15
our connection is gonna go from our router to our switch to our patch panel to our wall. Drop over to our to our key Stonewall, drop over to our computer.
14:24
And if we needed to say change what network? This computer was on change which v land because computer was on,
14:33
all we would have to do
14:37
is simply unplug from our switch
14:41
and then plug into a different switch or maybe plug into a different port.
14:45
Um, and if the report on a switch went bad or we would have to do is simply change it. Patch panels help simplifying
14:54
making changes to our network. It helps make it a lot easier to switch around connections and be able to maintain those connections throughout our network. So they are. They are a good idea to implement rather than just taking a cable and dropping it directly to our switch, especially if we had multiple switches here.
15:13
It'd be a lot easier to maintain
15:15
if we utilize our patch panel and then labeled our patch panel and then got him all plugged into our correct switches.
15:22
So thank you for joining us on cyber dot i t. And this module We talked about some of our different cables and connectors for everything from our co axl to our fiber connectors on how we implement them in our environments and what those cables look like. And how what the differences are between them
15:39
we talked about. We also talked about patch panels and a little bit about 66 blocks
15:45
as well as 1 10 blocks and are different
15:48
media converters. So hopefully this information will help you to better, better realize what are different. Cables and connectors are capable of how they function in our different environments and where we would be where we would find and use different cables and connectors when we're talking about you setting up different data networks.
16:07
So again, thank you for joining us. And hopefully we'll see you here next time on cyber dot i t
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